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How To Remove Spray Paint From A Mirror?

That old mirror you’ve been keeping around would look wonderful with just a lick of paint on the frame – you’ll make it look like new!

However, as we all know – painting can be a messy job, and all it takes is one quick slip for a mess to be made exactly where you don’t want it! Once you’ve got paint on your mirror, you’re probably thinking how much of a nightmare it’ll be to clean it off!

how to remove spray paint from a mirror

Luckily, it’s not impossible to easily clean up this mess! If you have some stray paint on your mirror, and are wondering exactly how you’re going to clean it off, then don’t worry – this article has you covered!

Simply read on to find out how to remove spray paint from a mirror!

Wet Paint

Now, of course, as the old adage goes – an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure! If you don’t want paint on your mirror, don’t put it there in the first place and it won’t be a problem!

Of course, it’s easy to say something like that – but accidents happen, and it’s good to know what you can do to remedy them, just in case!

If you have made a slip-up, then the best thing to do is to clean it up before it becomes a harder job! Wiping some wet paint away is almost always going to be far easier to do than having to deal with it after drying.

Paint can soak into, and form chemical bonds with the surface that it’s drying on – making removal from some surfaces very difficult!

Having a few clean cloths on hand when painting means that you’ll always have something available to clean up with. So, if any spills or mistakes do happen, it’ll simply be a case of stopping work quickly and wiping down the affected area as quickly as possible.

Have some rags ready, some water, and some turpentine/white spirit, just in case. Deal with any spills as soon as possible before they dry, and they won’t have time to become a serious problem later on!

Dry Paint

Of course, as much as a suggestion like the above is a good one, it’s not always easy or possible to clean up a mistake or a mess like this before it dries.

It might be too much of a big job for you to be able to stop to clean up a minor mess – if you have a lot to do, often it’s better to let minor mistakes slide, as long as it’s less time and effort to fix them later than it is to do them on the job.

Or, perhaps you’re looking to remove paint from something that you never had a hand in painting in the first place – the paint was already dry on the glass before you ever laid hands or eyes on it!

In which case, it’s hardly your fault – and you likely just want an easy way to fix the problem. Don’t worry – this guide can help!

Paint Remover

The obvious solution is to reach straight for some paint stripper – and indeed, this is often the best solution. It doesn’t involve you physically having to scrape the paint off of the mirror, meaning that you’re not at risk of marking or damaging it!

Instead, a paint stripper will simply soften the dry paint enough so that you can simply scrape it off. (Use a metal scraper to avoid worrying about damage!)

Always read the manufacturer’s instructions, and work in a very well ventilated area. Open doors and windows as much as possible!

Apply the paint stripper to the affected area using a paintbrush. Usually, you’ll have to wait some time for the paint to break down – between 10 and 10 minutes, but of course pay attention to the instructions.

After waiting the right amount of time, the paint should have softened and broken down enough to be easily scraped off with a plastic scraper. Afterwards, simply wipe down with a damp, clean cloth, and your mirror should be paint-free!

Scrape With A Razor

For smaller areas – or if you simply don’t want to use any chemicals to solve the problem – you can try simply scraping the paint off! This can be done with either a scraper, or a razor blade.

Obviously, there are safety caveats if you’re going to use a razor blade!

First and foremost – keep your hands away from the sharp edge! A razor blade will slice your fingers before you even have a chance to realize it, and can cause a lot of harm very quickly.

Be extremely careful when handling razors, and make sure to always keep away from the sharp side!

Always use a fresh, unused razor blade. If the blade is used, and corroded in any way, discard it safely and get a new one! Any bumps or imperfections in the edge will make doing the job of removing paint with it a lot harder than it needs to be!

Press firmly enough to remove the paint from the mirror, but don’t use too much pressure. If you press too hard, you run the risk of bad things happening!

You could slip, and have an extremely bad accident with the razor blade – it will cut you into ribbons before you know it if you’re not careful! You could also cause the blade to snap, potentially sending hazardous metal into the air.

Or, you could accidentally mark, scratch, or even break the mirror – after all, glass isn’t as tough as the metal of a razor blade!

Stay Safe!

No matter what method you use to remove paint from your mirror, there are always safety issues. Being aware of them can save you pain and injury – as well as damage to your work!

Always ensure that you’re wearing gloves to protect your hands from any chemicals. Breathing protection and eye protection should always be considered essential too!

And always allow for adequate ventilation, and spend time out of the room if you’re using chemicals that give off noxious fumes.

Conclusion

Paint can be annoying to remove from glass, but it’s not impossible! Hopefully you’ve learned through reading this guide some ways to safely and easily remove paint from a mirror.

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About Lisa Bohrer

Lisa is a native Texan who says she wears many hats. She is a wife, mother, grandmother, farmer, animal lover, fisherwoman, gardener, and college student. Lisa is a sophomore at Liberty University where she is taking classes to earn her Associates Degree in Creative Writing. She and her husband of 35 years fill their days with life on the farm raising goats and chickens, and then most evenings she can be found at the computer writing, or researching a topic that has piqued her interest.

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